COMMUNIVERSITY

Cultivating a vibrant and healthy community by providing fun and informative programs on and off the farm.

COMMUNIVERSITY

COMMUNIVERSITY

COMMUNIVERSITY

Groundwork

COMMUNIVERSITY

We love the interconnection and exchange community can bring. Our Communiversity programs are collaborative offerings which focus on creating space for learning, unlearning, healing, growth and belonging.

Cultured Kitchen

Multicultural Cooking & Home Provisioning

Food shapes who we are, shows us where we came from, and gives us a glimpse into our future. Tune it to watch featured videos from our farm kitchen and good food travels, sharing the people and stories behind the meals we love. Check our events calendar to register for upcoming classes and workshops where we learn new dishes, dine and discover together.

Farm Fit

Health & Wellness – Mind, Body, and Spirit

We are currently postponed Farm Fit Yoga but hope resume the morning sessions once the pandemic no longer poses as severe of a threat. We also hope to add Tai Chi, self defense, and more. Classes are typically 30  – 45 min. and are donation based – paid directly to the instructor. The suggested cost is $15 per class. Individual class details are provided on the event calendar.

All skill levels, ages over 16, body types, weights, fitness, and ability levels are welcome.

Here’s What to Bring:

Your ‘A’ game

Water

Towel or mat

Sneakers or walking shoes

Appropriate clothing to warm up, work out and cool down in

Sunscreen

A well rested you (get enough sleep)

Good eating habits

Black Sheep Fiber Circle

A maker-style sista circle and fiber arts gathering dedicated to all the beautiful Black sheep who love to create, enjoy, and explore the legacy of African, African- and Indigenous-American textiles (and more). Share your sewing, knitting, crochet, weaving, spinning, quilting, dyeing, or whatever fiber project you’re working on. Any and all skill levels welcome!

Gather & Create

2021 Fiber Intensive

April – October, 2021 Hands-on Learning Exchange. These are all things that we’ll be doing throughout the seasons, and would love to share with others. Participants would visit as frequently as once/week to as infrequently as once or twice a month. Virtual gatherings will also be arranged.

Protein Fibers Tract

Wool, Fluff, and Stuff – producing and working with sheep and rabbit fiber 

Note: We have already sheared for this year and the fiber is at the mill (in Cleveland, GA), but is not processed yet. We have a date scheduled in May to go up and help with finishing. A potential tour is tentatively being scheduled. I also have some finer wool and fibers on hand that would not be as suitable for milling that we can process by hand. If this tract sounds fun, let me know asap and we can sort out what parts to do together.

  • History & Culture – learn the background and multicultural significance of the animals that hold importance in our ecosystem, economy, and ancestral memory (delivered through collaborative exchange, talking circles, and recommended reading)
  • Handling sheep and/or angora rabbits and basic intro to husbandry, lambing, gestating, integrated pasture rotation and health checks, breeding, and parasite control, etc.
  • Shearing/Plucking (for hand-spinner flocks) – (video)
  • Fiber (fluff) grooming and harvesting of Angora rabbits
  • How to evaluate wool (wool basics: protein vs. cellulose fibers, 5 characteristic categories of wool, microns, staple, etc.)
  • Cleaning and handling – suint baths and/or washing and scouring wool
  • Fiber prep options – to blend or not to blend – prepping for the right project
  • Spinning 101 – getting started, using drop spindles and wheels, worsted vs woolen, singles, 2 and 3 ply yarns
  • Felting – no wool left behind: wet vs. needle
  • Finishing – fiber farming meets fiber arts; creating (knitting, weaving, felting) your finished project (apron)

 

Cellulose Fibers Tract

Bast fibers – cultivating and working with plant based fibers 

Note: The 3 main plant based fibers that I intend to introduce to the farm this year are flax, nettles, and hibiscus (jute). The first two are new to me and are very experimental in their growth and cultivation at this stage. The first two are in their beginning stages in the ground (only a week or two and are still getting established). Seeding/sowing of the hibiscus will not happen until after last frost.

  • History of each plant – learn the background and multicultural significance of the plants and textiles that hold importance in our ecosystem, economy, and ancestral memory (delivered through collaborative exchange, talking circles, and recommended reading)
  • Cultivation for the ideal yield 
  • Bast fiber characteristics – matching the fiber with the right project
  • Harvesting & Production – from retting, breaking, to spinning
  • Fiber prep options – blending for optimal quality
  • Spinning 101 – getting started, using drop spindles and wheels for singles, 2 and 3 ply yarns
  • Finishing – fiber farming meets fiber arts; creating (knitting, weaving, felting) your finished project (apron)

 

Living Color Tract

Natural dyes – cultivating, foraging, and working with a variety of natural dye materials  

Note: I’ve only just begun to play with mushroom and lichen dyes, but would like to continue to learn-a-long with others. The first of our fiber forest is being planted now. Seeds are being started for a variety of plants, flowers, roots, etc., including 3 possible varieties of indigo producing plants, for dyeing on-farm products as well as offering dyes direct to the market. THIS IS ALL NEW to us!!

  • History of each plant – learn the background and multicultural significance of the plants and textiles that hold importance in our ecosystem, economy, and ancestral memory (delivered through collaborative exchange, talking circles, and recommended reading)
  • Growing and Cultivating Color – planting a rainbow; knowing and meeting the needs of your crops, as well as understanding their various uses 
  • Harvesting & Production – how and when to harvest for peak performance
  • The science and fundamentals of natural dyes – second-hand access to a natural dye course – dyes for protein vs cellulose fibers, (what are tannins and which mordant is for which fiber)
  • Finishing – fiber farming meets fiber arts; creating (knitting, weaving, felting) your finished project (apron)

Ubuntu Program

I am because we are

The Ubuntu: Community Cultivation Program is our signature community-building program, designed to help individuals develop a stronger sense of belonging and well-being within a diverse community. Over the course of this 6-month intensive program, with the farm as our backdrop, participants are challenged and supported as they work, study, grow, and “do life” together; addressing the historic and contemporary influences of systemic racism and “othering”, which act as barriers to our humanity. Through our unique hands-on approach, combining personal leadership, community-development, and sustainable food practices we help foster each participant’s growth as agents of change – creating a sustainable community-oriented vision of our way forward.

Join us as we help cultivate an equitable and inclusive community – equipping you to better relate to others and ultimately the world at large.

vision

Creating a thriving hub for ancestral agrarian arts, land-based education, and regenerative growth. Cultivating goodwill and understanding between people across difference through education, hospitality, and play.

mission

To steward and sustain an evolving agroecosystem, providing local communities with quality food, food-based education, and support for an equitable food system.

© 2021 High Hog Farm, LLC

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